Category Archives: Privacy

New Digital Assets Law Coming to California???

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What happens to your Facebook account when you die… does it die too? What about your PayPal account, iTunes library and all your other valuable digital assets? States around the country have begun to pass legislation that allow individuals to access social media accounts and other digital accounts on behalf of a deceased individual.

To date, over 20 states have passed their own laws to protect digital assets and give the heirs/executor the right to access and manage online accounts after death. There have been tragic examples of people who have passed away and family members and loved ones were unable to access their social media and other electronic accounts due to terms of use and privacy policies.

California Digital Assets Law

An individual may “use an online tool to direct the custodian to disclose to a designated recipient or not disclose some or all of the user’s digital assets.”

California is the latest state to pass a digital assets bill. If it makes it out of the Assembly and is signed by governor Jerry Brown, the California Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act will provide guidelines for how companies can share deceased individuals’ digital records such as emails and social media accounts following death. The law will grant the social media website or online company the right to grant full or partial access to a designated recipient.[1]

The California digital assets law is a sign of our new electronic times. It is also a reminder that attorneys must now recognize their client’s digital assets and identify how their clients want the assets to be accessed or distributed after their death. To access a CLE course on digital assets please click here: Digital Asset Landscape: Preparation for Changes in Legislation.

[1] The company must first receive a written request, a certified copy of the death certificate and/or a certified copy of the letter of appointment of the representative, along with authenticating information about the deceased user.

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CLE on Bankruptcy, Money Laundering & Terrorism

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Spearheaded by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), leaders and governments have sought to monitor and suppress money laundering and terrorism financing around the globe. This became even more pressing here at home after the 9/11 terror attacks. Due to our legal system and the use of anonymous entities like LLCs, the United States is an easy place to hide money and terrorists have begun using our financial and legal systems to launder dirty money and clandestinely move it around the world to finance terrorist and other illegal operations. Unfortunately for attorneys, there is a very fine line between assisting clients and crossing into criminal activity.

Dirty money gets produced by organized crime and other criminals though drug trafficking, prostitution, tax evasion, corruption, financial crime and many other sources.

Peter W. Bowie, the former Chief Judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of California, has seen these matters develop first hand from his view from the bench. In this CLE course, Judge Bowie explores the evolving link between bankruptcy, money laundering & terrorist financing and the attorney’s duty to investigate. The main topics addressed by Judge Bowie include money laundering around the globe, the use of anonymous entities to hide money and the attorneys increased duty to investigate. To access this course please click here: Bankruptcy, Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing.

Additional topics presented in this CLE course:

  • The Financial Action Task Force (FATF) on Money Laundering’s 40 recommendations
  • The 2002 ABA Task Force
  • ABA Formal Opinion 463
  • Risk based client due diligence
  • How individuals hide money from creditors
  • The anonymous purchase of numerous high end American properties
    The 2016 GlobalWitness.org report
  • The Panama Papers
  • Confidentiality
  • Attorney-client privilege
  • Rule 11
  • Recent case law regarding attorney investigations

Peter W. Bowie, former Chief Judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of California, spent 27 years on the bench. He leverages his vast experience in the courtroom to conduct mediation settlement conferences and contribute to the firm’s mediation practice. A skilled mediator, Judge Bowie has successfully resolved several vigorously contested, large fee application disputes, and other important cases. Before joining the bench, he served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California for 14 years, the last six as Chief Assistant U.S. Attorney, overseeing operations of the criminal and civil divisions. Earlier in his career, he served as a trial attorney in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he was hired through the Department’s prestigious Honors Program.

This CLE course is offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • Missouri (MO)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers CLE for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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CLE Course on Attorney Workplace Investigations

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A thorough, effective and ethical internal investigation of an employee workplace complaint can help a company to avoid costly and protracted litigation, and form the foundation for a successful defense in the event that a lawsuit is eventually filed. Unfortunately, missteps are common in internal investigations and these mistakes can expose an employer to costly liability.

Workplace Investigations

Increasingly more employers are finding themselves facing the need to conduct internal workplace investigations as employee retaliation claims soar and the EEOC continues to focus on discrimination complaints.

In this CLE course, attorney & workplace investigator Amy Oppenheimer walks you through the best practices when conducting workplace investigations. She also focuses on how attorneys can recognize and avoid implicit bias and other biases when conducting workplace investigations. To access the course please click here: Attorneys Conducting Workplace Investigations.

Best practices and topics covered:

  • Reasons to conduct an internal investigation
  • The decision to conduct an investigation
  • The choice of investigators
  • Defining the scope of the investigation
  • Investigation planning
  • Communicating with representatives of the employer
  • Confidentiality & privacy
  • Evidence gathering & retention
  • Witness interviews
  • Investigation findings
  • Reports
  • Bias in the workplace
  • Bias in investigations
  • The impacts of investigations

Amy Oppenheimer is an attorney and retired Administrative Law Judge with over thirty years of experience in the field of employment law.[1] Ms. Oppenheimer has trained lawyers, human resource professionals, employees, and employers throughout the country in preventing and investigating workplace harassment, discrimination and retaliation, implicit bias and diversity in the workplace. She is the founder and president of the board of AWI (Association of Workplace Investigators, Inc.) and is an advisor to the executive committee of the labor and employment section of the California State Bar. She is a trial qualified expert on the issue of employment practices in preventing, responding to and investigating workplace harassment or discrimination.

This CLE course is offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • Missouri (MO)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers CLE for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: IL CLE.

[1] Emphasizing preventing and responding to workplace harassment and discrimination.

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CLE Course on Education & Student Data Privacy

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BYOD, sexting, facial recognition software, security cameras, online learning portals – welcome to the 21st century classroom!! Technology has dramatically changed the landscape of education – school is definitely not the same place that we went to. One major result of technology in schools has been the massive proliferation of student data and information collected about students by third party vendors such as Google.

Education & Data Privacy

Today’s classrooms increasingly employ the on-demand delivery of personalized content and virtual online forums to facilitate student and teacher interaction, in addition to a wealth of other interactive technologies that help to enhance the learning process. While these technologies have the potential to revolutionize the educational process, they also create a myriad of new questions about how to best protect student privacy.

In this incredibly timely course, Gretchen Shipley discusses data privacy issues faced by schools and school districts in our era of burgeoning digital technology. A respected legal leader in education law & technology, Gretchen mainly discusses student privacy, the 21st century classroom, data collected by school districts, key student privacy laws and specific data privacy issues faced by schools. To access the course please click here: Let’s Talk About Private Parts: Education & Data Privacy.

Further topics covered in this CLE course:

  • Integrated data systems
  • Security cameras & video
  • Educational websites & software companies
  • Educational software provider agreements
  • BYOD policies in schools
  • Sexting
  • Search & seizure
  • Live video feeds in the classroom
  • Online threats by students
  • Data breaches
  • Cyber insurance
  • Privacy Information Assessment (PIA)
  • Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA)
  • FERPA
  • COPPA
  • CEPA
  • FOYA
  • HIPAA

Gretchen M. Shipley is a partner in the San Diego area office of Fagen Friedman & Fulfrost and co-chair of the firm’s eMatters Practice Group. A respected legal leader in education law and technology, Mrs. Shipley advises school districts and presents workshops to students, employees and district leaders nationwide on the promotion of digital citizenship in the school community and the implications of cyber-misconduct in the classroom and workplace. She has also collaborated with the Association of California School Administrators to co-produce the popular “Logged On” seminars, created to offer guidance on employee and student issues that stem from embedding technology into public education.

This CLE course is offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Delaware (DE)
  • Florida (FL)
  • Georgia (GA)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • Missouri (MO)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)
  • Washington

Attorney Credits offers CLE for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. For more information about CLE in Illinois please click the following link: IL CLE.

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CLE Course: Issue Spotting in Criminal Law Cases

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There is a great deal at risk when a person is accused of a crime. Your client’s life and liberty are at stake, and there is a lot of information you need to be able to recognize to ensure that your client’s rights are properly protected. Whether you are a civil attorney that needs a refresher on criminal law or you are an attorney that’s just starting out in criminal practice, this CLE program will cover the basics of criminal defense and issue spotting in criminal cases.

Common issues in criminal law courses:

  • Whether the questioning of the defendant was legal
  • Did the police have a legal reason to stop the defendant
  • Whether the police unlawfully seized evidence

In this Criminal Law 101 course, attorney Paul Ghanouni mainly discusses constitutional issues, police-citizen encounters, statements to police and search & seizure law. Attorneys that take this course will be able to: recognize key issues in criminal case, discuss common criminal law issues, identify key facts and conduct research on criminal topics. While this course does discuss key criminal topics & issues, it does not discuss the specific elements of criminal offenses because this information is specific to each jurisdiction. To access the course please click here: Criminal Law: Issue Spotting 101.

Further issues addressed in this CLE course:[1]

  • The exclusionary rule
  • The right to counsel
  • The right to silence
  • Voluntary statements
  • Searches of persons & motor vehicles
  • The plain view doctrine
  • The fruit of the poisonous tree doctrine
  • Key practice points

Paul Ghanouni is a criminal defense attorney based in Woodstock, Georgia. After beginning his career at a small firm, he founded his own law practice in 2007 and now specializes in teen and young adult defense. He is a regular presenter on legal issues before legal and community groups. Outside of his practice he is active with the Blue Ridge Bar Association, having served as vice president and president. He is a member of the Woodstock Optimist Club.

This CLE course is offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • Missouri (MO)
  • New Hampshire (NH)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

[1] Case law discussed in this CLE course includes: Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 (1968), Beck v. Ohio, 379 U.S. 89 (1964), Moran v. Burbine, 475 U.S. 412 (1986), Davis v. United States, 512 U.S. 452 (1994), Miller v. Fenton, 474 U.S. 104 (1985), Mincey v. Arizona, 437 U.S. 385, Lynumn v. Illinois, 372 U.S. 528 (1963), Chimel v. California, 395 U.S. 752 (1969), United States v. Sharpe, 470 U.S. 675 (1985), Arizona v. Gant, 556 US 332 (2009), South Dakota v. Opperman, 428 U.S. 364 (1976), Pennsylvania v. Labron, 518 U.S. 938 (1996) and Horton v. California, 496 U.S. 128 (1990).

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CLE Course on How the Supreme Court Analyzes Evolving Technology

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Almost 100 years ago, the Supreme Court was forced to decide on the admissibility of evidence from a groundbreaking new technology – the systolic blood pressure test. At the time, the evidence from the systolic blood pressure test – or lie detector test – was held to be inadmissible because it was not “sufficiently established to have gained general acceptance in the particular field in which it belongs.”

Advances in sciences yield new, novel and high technology, much of which has significant legal ramifications. Unfortunately, technology evolves much faster than the laws can keep up and courts are forced to apply old legal doctrines to novel situations in our new digital world.

Fast-forward almost a century later and the Supreme Court now routinely decides major cases involving technology, reasonable expectations of privacy and the Fourth Amendment. In 2001, the Supreme Court aptly noted in Kyllo v. United States that technology has the power to erode Fourth Amendment privacy – and that seems to be exactly what’s happened in the ensuing years. Today, technological advances have given law enforcement powerful new tools at their disposal — stingrays, drones, thermal imaging devices, facial recognition software — to conduct surveillance and investigate criminal activity. Yet courts have been slow to keep pace with these technological changes and they have been split all over the map on what constitutes a violation of the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against unreasonable search and seizure.

To learn more about how the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) has analyzed evolving technologies, please join attorney and forensic expert Herbert Joe as he details the court’s analysis on emerging technologies – from the lie detector test to digital technologies. Mr. Joe presents and discusses Frye vs. U.S. (polygraph machine), Katz vs. U.S. (recording devices), Kyllo vs. U.S. (thermal imaging devices), U.S. vs. Jones (GPS tracking devices), U.S. vs. Wurie and Riley vs. California (smartphone searches).

To access this course please click here: From Katz to Riley: How SCOTUS Analyzes Evolving Technology. Herbert Joe is a forensic scientist with 4 degrees, Graduate Faculty (Law) at the University of Phoenix and a Registered Patent Attorney. As managing partner of Yonovitz & Joe, L.L.P., his firm has been involved in 1000s of cases involving forensic audio/acoustic/voice/video evidence for the past 27 years. He is also a Certified Mediator, licensed to practice law in Texas and Oklahoma, a Registered Patent Attorney with the United States Patent & Trademark Office, and a Member of the College of the State Bar of Texas. He has testified in state and Federal courts in civil and criminal cases throughout the U.S. and overseas as an expert witness in forensic audio, acoustic, voice and video evidence, as well as an expert in patent law in patent infringement cases. Clients include all levels of state and Federal governmental entities, law firms throughout the world, Fortune 100 companies, Public Defender’s Office throughout the U.S.

This CLE course is currently offered in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • North Dakota (ND)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in New York and around the country. For more information about CLE in New York please click the following link: NY CLE.

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CLE Course: Online Security & Risk Basics for Attorneys

We now live in the digital era – an era of social media, mobile phones & devices and being connected and online 24/7. There are many benefits for attorneys and law firms that adopt and utilize online technology to enhance their practice and provide more cost-effective and efficient service to their clients. Unfortunately, there are numerous risks that are involved with utilizing online technologies as well.

“Which risks are relevant?  Those that impact business goals.  Which risks impact business goals?  They all do.” – Deborah Gonzalez

In this new CLE course, Deborah Gonzales of Law2SM presents the tools and resources that you need to better understand the security and reputational risks of online and digital activity for attorneys and how to mitigate those risks to minimize potential losses. The focus of Online Security & Risk Basics for Attorneys is to present security and risk management best practices that address major concerns for attorneys in our new online environment.

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There is a wealth of practical information presented in this course and Ms. Gonzalez provides numerous practice points for attorneys to adopt in their everyday practice to minimize online risks.  The main topics addressed include setting the context of our new digital world, mobile devices, apps & BYOD, reputational risk, big data, content management/marketing, compliance and what you can do to mitigate your risk.

Further issues addressed in this CLE course include:

  • The relevant risks
  • Digital threats
  • Social media/online risk
  • Online security
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Sources of risk
  • Why risks happen
  • Crafting a social media policy
  • The NLRB’s (National Labor Relations Board) role in regulation
  • The 5 C’s
  • Monitoring risks
  • Suggested alerts
  • Metadata/geo-tagging
  • Protecting your online identity
  • Compliance with rules & regulations
  • The SEC regulations
  • FTC & compliance
  • Disclaimers
  • The FCC & net neutrality
  • COPPA (Children’s’ Online Privacy Protection Act)
  • The compliance toolkit
  • Audits & assessment
  • SLA™ Risk Assessment
  • Protecting yourself and your firm through insurance coverage

The founder of Law2SM, Deborah Gonzalez is an attorney whose legal practice focuses on music, art, entertainment, digital, social media and online law. She obtained her JD from New York Law School and is licensed to practice in both New York and in Georgia. Her clients include galleries, museums, artists & art professionals, animators, filmmakers, musicians & music professionals, authors, and various other creative professionals. Ms. Gonzalez is a member of the Georgia Production Partnership, Georgia Entertainment Association, Women in Animation, and the Entertainment Law sections of the Georgia and New York Sate Bar Associations. She speaks at various industry conferences around the world, such as SEIGE CON and SIAF, on legal issues and concerns for artists of all genres.  Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in Illinois and around the country. To access more information about Illinois CLE please click the following link: IL CLE:

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Digital Citizenship in Schools: From Policy to Practice

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The schools of today are very different than the schools of our youth. Students today are faced with cyberbullying, sexting, Facebook and all the novel problems that our new digital world has created over the last decade. Schools and school districts must know how to address and respond to these new issues created by digital technologies so they can best help students and avoid potential liability.

In an era of sexting, cyberbullying, and Facebook, school administrators walk a fine line in trying to provide a safe school environment and at the same time, trying not to infringe on student first amendment rights. – Gretchen Shipley

If you would like to learn more about emerging legal issues in schools created by technology please join Gretchen Shipley as she uses a hypothetical fact pattern to discuss these emerging issues. The main topics covered by Mrs. Shipley include search & seizure, mandatory reporting of abuse & neglect, sexting, social networking, teacher-student online communication, teachers’ cyber conduct, student discipline for online speech, bring your own device & equal access, cyberbullying, student privacy rights and potential breaches of privacy law.  To access the course please click here: Digital Citizenship in Schools: From Policy to Practice.

Further issues discussed include:

  • eMatters
  • Klump v. Nazareth
  • Sexting by students
  • Freedom of association
  • “Fitness to teach”
  • The “related to school activity” standard
  • The substantial disruption standard
  • S. v. Blue Mountain
  • FERPA
  • CIPA
  • J.C. v. Beverly Hills
  • The Fourth Amendment
  • COPPA
  • GeoLocation & iPad tracking
  • School video cameras
  • Pictures on school websites
  • Data mining by technology vendors
  • Social media monitoring (GeoListening)
  • Device search & seizure

Gretchen Shipley is a partner in the San Diego office of Fagen Friedman & Fulfrost and co-chair of the firm’s eMatters Practice Group. A respected legal leader in education law and technology, Mrs. Shipley advises school districts and delivers workshops to students, employees and district leaders nationwide on the promotion of cyber-citizenship in the school community and the implications of cyber-misconduct in the classroom and workplace. She has also collaborated with the Association of California School Administrators to co-produce the popular “Logged On” seminars, created to offer guidance on employee and student issues that stem from embedding technology into public education.

This CLE course on digital citizenship in schools is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • New York (NY)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country. For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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Reducing the Risk and Cost of Cross-border and Multi-lingual eDiscovery Cases

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Recent court decisions imposing sanctions and holding both in-house and outside counsel responsible for poor electronic discovery practices make it clear that all attorneys need to understand the basics of electronic discovery – or at least know when and how to engage colleagues, litigation support teams and service providers who are experts in the field.  Complicating this challenge is the fact that many businesses have an international presence and have offices and employees scattered across the globe.  With the increasing global reach of both business and economic activity, the incidence of cross-border and multi-language litigation is rapidly increasing.  And countries in Europe, Asia and elsewhere around the world have much more strict data privacy laws than the United States that affect how electronic information can be discovered.

Agenda for Course

  • Cross-Border Legal Considerations
  • International Collection Strategies
  • Using technology to lower cost & risk of foreign language review

This CLE course presented by Jeff Jacobs, Associate General Counsel for DTI, will address how to resolve some of the principle discovery challenges involved in cross-border and multi-language litigation.  The main topics discussed by Mr. Jacobs include dealing with non-U.S data privacy laws & regulations, cross-border legal considerations, international collection strategies, using technology to lower the cost & risk of foreign language review and resolving cultural & foreign language issues that may arise in the course of conducting cross-border discovery.  To access the course please click here: Reducing the Risk and Cost of Cross-border and Multi-lingual eDiscovery Cases.

Mr. Jacobs also addresses:

  • Discovery versus privacy around the world
  • Global approaches to personal privacy
  • EU data privacy developments
  • The Sedona framework
  • Jurisdiction
  • Blocking statutes
  • International data privacy laws
  • EU members state penalties
  • Hague evidence collection
  • Resolving international disputes
  • Collecting international information
  • Language identification
  • Special handling for Asian, European and Arabic languages
  • Review strategies
  • The form of production

Jeff Jacobs is the General Counsel and Senior Consultant for Document Technologies, Inc. (DTI).  For the past five years he has advised clients on litigation readiness, email & records retention and the planning & execution of electronic discovery matters.  Prior to joining DTI, Jeff spent seven years as an Associate Litigation Counsel at MCI/WorldCom, where he managed the electronic discovery associated with the government investigations of the WorldCom accounting fraud, related securities class actions and other litigation and the acquisition of MCI by Verizon.  He also served as counsel to the company’s Records and Information Management group and managed the subpoena compliance unit.  Before MCI, he was a Special Counsel in the litigation group of Sullivan & Cromwell’s Washington, DC office.  Jeff is a graduate of Williams College and the University of Chicago Law School and was in the first class of candidates to qualify as a certified electronic discovery specialist by the Association of Electronic Discovery Specialists (ACEDS).

This CLE course on reducing the risk and cost of cross-border and multi-lingual eDiscovery cases is currently accredited in the following states:

  • Alaska (AK)
  • Arizona (AZ)
  • California (CA)
  • Connecticut (CT)
  • District of Columbia (DC)
  • Illinois (IL)
  • Maryland (MD)
  • Massachusetts (MA)
  • Michigan (MI)
  • New Jersey (NJ)
  • Pennsylvania (PA)
  • South Dakota (SD)

Attorney Credits offers continuing legal education (CLE) for attorneys in California and around the country.  For more information about CLE in California please click the following link: CA CLE.

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CLE Course: Ten Social Media Myths for Attorneys

Social media has changed society and along with it the practice of law.  Those attorneys who previously adopted the “Ostrich” approach – burying their heads in the sand and hoping it would all go away – must pull their head out and learn to adapt to our new Web 2.0 world.

It is now apparent that social media is not a fad – it is a paradigm shift.  Like email, Twitter and Facebook are here to stay … and that’s just the beginning.  There are currently over 400 social media websites and the list continues to grow every month.

Web 2.0 World

Social media is not just for teenagers and college kids anymore, companies and professionals now utilize social media for many business purposes.  Attorneys must be cognizant of social media and the legal issues that it presents in order to avoid legal liability and ethical violations in their own practice, and to fully counsel the clients they represent.

If you need help understanding the complex intersection of social media and the law, we have just added an excellent CLE course entitled Ten Social Media Myths for Attorneys.  In this extremely current and informative CLE course, Deborah Gonzalez of Law2sm provides an extremely comprehensive overview of the legal issues created by social media.  This course delves beyond merely introductory social media concepts and goes in-depth into complex legal social media issues so that attorneys are better able to counsel their clients.  The main areas addressed by Ms. Gonzalez include what is social media, ten principal social media myths for attorneys and resources for attorneys.

Further topics discussed include:

  • The many forms of social media
  • The new digital world
  • Why attorneys & professionals use social media
  • The principles of social media
  • Ethical rules that apply to social media use by attorneys
  • Disclaimers
  • Trademark protection
  • The FTC & false credentials
  • Astroturfing
  • Twitter-jacking
  • Cyber-stalking
  • Privacy
  • Employment law issues
  • The criminal system & the right to a fair trial
  • Digital legacy
  • Digital assets
  • State & federal laws impacting social media

Deborah Gonzalez is an attorney whose legal practice focuses on art, music, entertainment, digital, social media and online law.  She is licensed to practice in both New York and Georgia, and her clients include museums, galleries, artists & art professionals, animators, filmmakers, musicians & music professionals, authors, and various other creative professionals.  Ms. Gonzalez is the legal advisor to the Georgia Music Industry Association and currently serves on the board of Women in Film & Television Atlanta.  She is also a member of the Georgia Entertainment Association, Georgia Production Partnership, Women in Animation, and the Entertainment Law sections of the Georgia and New York Sate Bar Associations.  She speaks at various industry conferences around the world – such as SEIGE CON and SIAF – on legal issues and concerns for artists of all genres.

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